A Remote Business Brings a New Twist to Medical Billing

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December 15, 2019

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Photo by Richard Schwartz

As the famous Ross Geller from “Friends” line goes, “PIVOT!” That is just what Marcy Schwartz did. Schwartz, 52 wanted to be able to work at home while raising kids and that’s when the pivot in her business happened. But it isn’t just a startup pivot, it’s more of her entrepreneurial journey to success. Schwartz was 36 when she ventured out on a new business idea.

She was working at her husband’s chiropractic office doing his billing and collections when a friend of his approached her asking if she would be willing to assist with the billing in the office. After a few years, she wanted to pivot her business and become an entrepreneur and work from home. 

“It was something completely new to me and I really wanted to be able to be able to raise my kids at home and still work, so I started my own business at home,” she says. 

Schwartz operates TJBilling. In detail, the business handles everything for a doctor after the patient walks into the office until the doctor gets paid from the insurance company. They provide the demographic information needed and they input it into their system. The business also sends claims to the insurance companies in most cases and it is completely electronic. 

Schwartz shares that there was no external funding needed. She started off the business with just two clients and eventually hired more. As the business grew, she was able to take in so many she can not even keep track of how many clients are in her system. She has 27 offices across the United States that she collects for and she currently employs seven people. 

“I haven’t had to do any branding, all of my business has been from word of mouth. I am currently working on an updated website and plan to pay someone to help me target people to see my website to attract even more business” Schwartz says. 

Schwartz explained that she found there was a problem with her startup business at first. “There was a huge problem with part time employees who earn hourly wages collecting money for doctors in the office. It brings negative energy into the office, and doctors collect much more money when they outsource the billing to a company that works for a percentage of profit rather than an hourly fee.” 

Schwartz chose to shift her career from working with her husband to completely on her own and it has brought her great success along the way. In addition to chiropractic billing, TJbilling has added podiatry and physical therapy billing to her repertoire. 

“We work closely with coders who have experience with medical coding and always stay on top of trends in the medical field” Schwartz adds. 

The entrepreneur offers a 401k to her employees and most of her clients have been with her for more than six to eight years. Each year her goal is to target around 4 new clients. She did not need much money up front because she hired people right out of the woods and was able to get a website up and running. 

Since she now works from home, she is more successful than ever. Her choice to pivot her plan and continue on her entrepeneurial journey has made the billing guru so happy. Her two kids that she raised while she worked are now college graduates and working adults. 

“I am extremely happy and proud of my success in my small business that has been running for 16 years and it is remotely from my home. I paid for both my children to go to college from my earnings.” 

Schwartz’s business has gone through a well worth it journey and she sees it only going up from here. 

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