Ethics of Reporting on Coronavirus Conspiracies

By and Allie Hutchison

November 1, 2021

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When an Oklahoma State University undergraduate was fired for her reporting on mask mandates, an ethical debate within the media community erupted. Some say the student should not have been fired for making an honest mistake. But others say that getting fired for her erroneous reporting is a lesson in being held accountable.

Allie Hutchison and Will Schick examine the ethical debate surrounding the student’s dismissal from her job as editor in chief at the school’s newspaper in this podcast.

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